Risk Assessment is a foundational requirement for an effective security or privacy program and it needs to be the basis for every investment decision in information security or privacy. To that extent, we strongly recommend it as the very first thing that organizations do when you they set out on implementing or improving a program. It is no surprise then that most regulations also include them as mandatory requirements (e.g. HIPAA Security Rule, Meaningful Use Stages 1 and 2 for Healthcare Providers,  PCI DSS 2.0). Yet, we continue to see many organizations do not perform it right, if they perform one at all. This is true at least in the Healthcare sector that we  focus on.  They see it as just another compliance requirement and go through the motions.

So, we thought about a list of “Top 10 Pitfalls” related to Risk Assessments. We present them here and will be looking to expand and discuss each of these pitfalls in separate posts to follow.

    1. Performing risk analysis without knowing all the locations the data you are looking to safeguard (PHI, PII etc.) is created, received, stored, maintained or transmitted
    2. Approaching it with a compliance or audit mindset rather than a risk mindset
    3. Mistaking controls/gap assessment for risk analysis. Hint: Controls/Gap Assessment is but one of several steps in risk analysis.
    4. Focusing on methodologies and templates rather than outcomes; We discuss the idea here
    5. Not having a complete or holistic view of the threats and vulnerabilities and hence failing to articulate and estimate the likelihood adequately
    6. Not realizing that no security controls framework (e.g. NIST 800-53, HITRUST CSF etc.) is perfect and using the security controls in these frameworks without a sense of context in your environment
    7. Poor documentation – Reflects likely lack of due diligence and could lead to bad decision making or at the very least may not pass an audit
    8. Writing Remediation or Corrective Action Plans without specialist knowledge and experience in specific remediation areas
    9. Inadequate planning and lack of curiosity, investigative mindset or quality in engagement oversight
    10. Not engaging the right stake holders or “owners” throughout the risk assessment process and especially in signing off on remediation recommendations or Corrective Action Plans

We’ll be delighted to hear your feedback and will look to perhaps even grow this list based on the feedback. After all, this is about being a good steward of the security or privacy program dollars and managing risks to our organizations, customers or partners.

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